TRF – moving our eating window forward

Sous vide French onion steak with broccolini

Well, well – I was just listening to Dr Bret Scher talking to Ryan Lowery (on Bret’s consistently excellent podcast, now under the Diet Doctor umbrella) [1].

Ryan mentioned (as a few, including Dr Jason Fung, have said before) that eating breakfast/lunch was better for you than lunch/dinner, and that triggered a GENIUS idea!

Have DINNER at CLOCK-BREAKFAST (8am), and LUNCH at LUNCH!

I’m pretty sure you can see how this is idea is in fact entirely and utterly GENIUS.

HOWEVER

When I told this clearly GENIUS idea to my wife, she (once again) looked at me like I was an idiot. “Dinner at clock-breakfast isn’t going to work for me,” was the (somewhat kindly version) gist of her response.

HOWEVER

She then said she’s happy to move clock-lunch to clock-breakfast, and then dinner to clock-lunch. #WINNING because she was deadset against the whole idea a couple of weeks ago.

What this means is we’re moving our feeding window forward from the current 1pm-7/8pm to 8am-2pm (or thereabouts).

So it’s still time-restricted feeding (TRF) so that insulin levels can stay lower for longer, but we eat before we expend all of our energy for the day, and we get nicely satiated early on rather than getting hungry to start with. It also means we’re not eating our biggest meal just before sleep.

We can also easily skip breakfast (which we currently never eat) when required, or when desired to make it a 24-hour (or longer) fast.

It also means we won’t be having any keto desserts while watching cooking shows after dinner, which isn’t a bad thing.

She’s worried about losing her “meal-prep is unwind time after work” if we’re not having dinner, but I pointed out that she could still do the prep then, just not eat immediately (i.e. until the next day). Not sure how well this will work, TBH, but should be fine. We will see, welcome to experimentation world.

We’re going to map out a plan tonight and test it later in the week.

[1] See my rundown on keto podcasts HERE.

[2] I think the moral of this story is that genius ideas may turn out to be genius in ways that are not initially apparent, but I’m not sure if that’s it or not.

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