Don’t link to reports that show the point you made is wrong

Here’s a story from The Age, which makes the following claim:

Workplace engagement is a significant issue for employers, with levels of engagement continuing to fall. Studies have shown that only 28 per cent of millennials are engaged at work.

If you click the link given in that paragraph, you get the following in the FIRST paragraph:

WASHINGTON, D.C. — Less than one-third (31.5%) of U.S. workers were engaged in their jobs in 2014. The average is up nearly two percentage points from 29.6% in 2013 and represents the highest reading since 2000, when Gallup first began tracking the engagement levels of the U.S. working population.

and in the conclusion:

Bottom Line

At 31.5%, employee engagement is at its highest level since Gallup first began measuring the performance indicator in 2000.

Not sure this supports the contention made, eh? If the link isn’t supposed to support the statement (leaving it completely unsupported in any way): “Workplace engagement is a significant issue for employers, with levels of engagement continuing to fall”, then don’t put it in the same paragraph as the link. And given the pretty obvious statements in the link, that surely should be explained why you’re claiming the opposite to a report you’ve linked to.

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